the exasperated viewer on air's more relaxed and private palace. farting noises. also: space, erotica, drugs, electronic music, trippy stuff, reason, science, skepticism, humanitarianism, majestic landscapes, contemporary art, stand-up, random and disturbing humor. p.s. this blog is listed as NSFW.
darkenergydetectives:

A Universe of PossibilitiesOver the course of billions of years, a new home is built. It will eventually house stars, planets…View Post

darkenergydetectives:

A Universe of Possibilities

Over the course of billions of years, a new home is built. It will eventually house stars, planets…

View Post

ppsh-41:

Unknown Bulgarian soldiers in 1941. The soldier on the left is holding a cigarette rolled from newspaper.

fyeah-history:

Vitosha, an early Bulgarian computer, 1960sThe People’s Republic of Bulgaria was a major producer of electronics and computers, thus receiving the nickname “Silicon Valley of the Eastern Bloc”.

fyeah-history:

Vitosha, an early Bulgarian computer, 1960s
The People’s Republic of Bulgaria was a major producer of electronics and computers, thus receiving the nickname “Silicon Valley of the Eastern Bloc”.

fucking-history:

A photograph depicting the remains of victims from the Batak massacre. In 1876, Bulgarian revolutionaries conducted an insurrection—known as the April Uprising—against the Ottoman government to establish sovereignty. Ottoman regular and irregular armies violently crushed the uprising, particularly in Batak. Ottoman irregular troops massacred thousands of Bulgarian civilians, despite the fact that many attempted to surrender. As international awareness of the event grew, Britain’s pro-Ottoman policy was criticized by other major powers, causing Britain to sever its alliance with the ailing empire. Britain’s refusal to fight for the Ottomans left the empire open to hostilities from Russia, which culminated in the Russo-Turkish war shortly thereafter (source of picture). 

fucking-history:

A photograph depicting the remains of victims from the Batak massacre. In 1876, Bulgarian revolutionaries conducted an insurrection—known as the April Uprising—against the Ottoman government to establish sovereignty. Ottoman regular and irregular armies violently crushed the uprising, particularly in Batak. Ottoman irregular troops massacred thousands of Bulgarian civilians, despite the fact that many attempted to surrender. As international awareness of the event grew, Britain’s pro-Ottoman policy was criticized by other major powers, causing Britain to sever its alliance with the ailing empire. Britain’s refusal to fight for the Ottomans left the empire open to hostilities from Russia, which culminated in the Russo-Turkish war shortly thereafter (source of picture). 

fyeah-history:

ON THIS DAY: 917 – Byzantine–Bulgarian Wars: Bulgarians led by Tsar Simeon I drove the Byzantines out of Thrace with a decisive victory in the Battle of Achelous (pictured).Click here to read more.

fyeah-history:

ON THIS DAY: 917 – Byzantine–Bulgarian Wars: Bulgarians led by Tsar Simeon I drove the Byzantines out of Thrace with a decisive victory in the Battle of Achelous (pictured).

Click here to read more.

historiandaily:

"For who could have anticipated that Simeon, who for his great wisdom, for the favour shown him by heaven, has led the Bulgarian nation to a height of glory, who more than any man detests knavery, who honours justice, who abominates injustice, who is above all sensual pleasures." -Nicholas Mystikos
May 27, 927 -Simeon I the Great, the first Bulgar Emperor, dies in his capital of Preslav. Simeon had led Bulgaria to it’s territorial zenith, occupying most of the Balkans, and becoming the dominant power in Eastern Europe. He also oversaw the Golden Age of Bulgarian culture, ruling during a time of unmatched prosperity for his people, and leading them to victories over all their neighbors, be they Byzantine, Serbs, or Magyar. 
Picture- Portrait of tsar Simeon I the Great, D. Giudjenov, 1927

historiandaily:

"For who could have anticipated that Simeon, who for his great wisdom, for the favour shown him by heaven, has led the Bulgarian nation to a height of glory, who more than any man detests knavery, who honours justice, who abominates injustice, who is above all sensual pleasures." -Nicholas Mystikos

May 27, 927 -Simeon I the Great, the first Bulgar Emperor, dies in his capital of Preslav. Simeon had led Bulgaria to it’s territorial zenith, occupying most of the Balkans, and becoming the dominant power in Eastern Europe. He also oversaw the Golden Age of Bulgarian culture, ruling during a time of unmatched prosperity for his people, and leading them to victories over all their neighbors, be they Byzantine, Serbs, or Magyar. 

Picture- Portrait of tsar Simeon I the Great, D. Giudjenov, 1927

this video rules!

space-pics:

Current Spacecrafts: Who’s Visiting Who?http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Uranus and Neptune - forever alone.

space-pics:

Current Spacecrafts: Who’s Visiting Who?
http://space-pics.tumblr.com/

Uranus and Neptune - forever alone.

“The saddest people I’ve ever met in life are the ones who don’t care deeply about anything at all. Passion and satisfaction go hand in hand, and without them, any happiness is only temporary, because there’s nothing to make it last.”

— Nicholas Sparks, Dear John
Sinemorets, Bulgaria, 1960s
regardintemporel:

Anonyme - Jeux d’Ombres Surréalistes, 1920-1925

regardintemporel:

Anonyme - Jeux d’Ombres Surréalistes, 1920-1925